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It's Amazing


This is a collection of fun things we didn't know what else to do with!  Enjoy!


Lion's Club

Do you have old prescription glasses you no longer need?  Save someone's vision!  We can donate them to the Lion's Club.  They will send them to clinics in 3rd World Countries. 



Color Blindness

The individual with normal color vision will see a 5 revealed in the dot pattern.
An individual with Red/Green (the most common) color blindness will see a 2 revealed in the dots.

(Not a completely reliable test because of variations of color on your screen)

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Anime Eyes

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These contact lenses are a fad in Japan and Korea.

They make the eyes appear larger like a Japanese anime cartoon.


Adjustable Prescription Glasses

Inventor's 2020 vision: to help 1 billion of the world's poorest see better

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A Zulu man wearing adaptive glasses. Photograph: Michael Lewis

A professor of physics at Oxford University, Silver was idly discussing optical lenses with a colleague

What if it were possible, he thought, to make a pair of glasses which could be "tuned" by the wearer to correct his or her own vision? Might it be possible to bring affordable spectacles to millions who would never otherwise have them?

More than two decades after posing that question, Silver now feels he has the answer. The British inventor has embarked on a quest that is breathtakingly ambitious, but which he insists is achievable - to offer glasses to a billion of the world's poorest people by 2020.

Some 30,000 pairs of his spectacles have already been distributed in 15 countries. Within the next year the now-retired professor and his team plan to launch a trial in India which will, they hope, distribute 1 million pairs of glasses.

Silver has devised a pair of glasses which rely on the principle that the fatter a lens the more powerful it becomes. Inside the device's tough plastic lenses are two clear circular sacs filled with fluid, each of which is connected to a small syringe attached to either arm of the spectacles.

The wearer adjusts a dial on the syringe to add or reduce amount of fluid in the membrane, thus changing the power of the lens. When the wearer is happy with the strength of each lens the membrane is sealed by twisting a small screw, and the syringes removed.

"The reaction is universal," says Major Kevin White, formerly of the US military's humanitarian programme, who organised the distribution of thousands of pairs around the world after discovering Silver's glasses on Google. "People put them on, and smile. They all say, 'Look, I can read those tiny little letters.'"



Dr. Richardson's daughter enjoys photo-shopping him into these fun photos!






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